Monthly Archives: October 2011

How to Formulate Ideas


Every weekday morning I walk the dog along the beach for half an hour.  It is a wonderful time of reflection and day dreaming.  This is usually the time I work out my ideas.  Sometimes I’m thinking of blog posts, sometimes I’m working through a problem at work but mostly I’m thinking of things to write.  But I have to ask myself: “Do I have a method and process for generating ideas?”  The answer is yes.  I get the answer quickly too, because I’m talking to myself.  Nice.

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As The West Queen Draws to an End


I’ve just finished writing that last new chapter for The West Queen. I have just three more chapters to revise and bring into line with the new organisation of the book. I should get through them this week. I then need to look at writing a synopsis, selecting agents, writing a query letter, submitting and getting on with my next book.

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A delicious recipe For Chilli


What a title for a blog entry? Novels are not the only book I’m writing. I’m also collaborating with my wife on a family cook book. We both love cooking and want to share our love with our children and anyone else who wants to eat delicious, easy to make at home dishes. We’ll be including some fairly basic standard recipes but also a selection of dishes that we have formulated ourselves. Today I thought I’d share with you my chile recipe. It was inspired by Mexican cuisine but involves my own touches.

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The Free Time Falacy


I’ve often heard people, and I’m one of them, say they would do such and such if they had more free time. I’ve also heard thought devoking (the opposite of invoking) advertisements on television ask the question: “Would you like more free time?” or similar. The main reason I bring it up is because I sat next to a woman on the train who saw me typing away, working on The West Queen and she said she would like to write a book, if she had the free time. So? So what?

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Cliche blog post


If I had to point to one thing that causes the great glut of rubbish entertainment, the junk food of art, it would be the cliché. Without empirical evidence and without citing references, I’m going to tell you flat-out tell you that clichés should be avoided and destroyed at all costs, except in one circumstance. As usual I’m going to run down my hows and whys of clichés.

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